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20121127
20121127
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
obama promise, but some promises are made to be broken, and i think this is probably a good move. but first up congress back at work tonight after the holiday recess with now just 35 days to go. are we any closer to a tax and fiscal cliff fix? cnbc's own chief washington correspondent john harwood joins us now with all the details. good evening, john. >> reporter: good evening, laurie, and i think we are getting somewhat closer, and the white house would count it as good news that you found common cause with their report on the impact of fiscal spending. let's talk for a moment about what's happened on the fiscal cliff by the numbers since that early constructive meeting with the congressional leaders and the president. the numbers are all one. there's one month left for these leaders to figure it out. two, 1.4 it is is the amount to be shaved off by gdp and one is the amount of trillions of dollars that democratic aides, senior democratic aides tell me is necessary to get a deal wit end of the year with the remaining 3 trillion of savings coming in the early part of next year, a
? medicare, medicaid carefully, these are chief drivers of our deficit. we made a lot of progress with obama care and there's other spending we have to cut. >> hold on a second. i think we all know what the chief drivers of our deficit are and have been. our projected deficit over the next seven years is driven mostly by the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the bush tax cuts. entitlement programs don't even compete with these costs. plouffe went on to pin the problem largely on republicans who are not flexible on higher tax rates, but he also said this. >> and so where i think the big bottleneck right now is republicans in congress on revenue and how much and where does it come from. democrats are also going to have to step up here and do some tough things. and you know, the notion that somehow that these deficits and our debt are not a threat to our national security and our economic future is something i could not disagree with more strongly, as does the president. there are some, maybe not so much in our party but some commentators on the left that suggest that we shouldn't deal with this
do about any of what he promised to do so let's look at the three obama promises. the first promise was in his first term when he said he will find a solution for the palestinian-israeli issue, and, unfortunately, we know what happened over the four years. that has not been that. it's an unfulfilled promise at best. some see it as a failed promise. the second promise the president of the united states had, unprecedented as it is, when he said the united states would never allow iran to be a nuclear power. now, this is unprecedented whether right or wrong, but it's something that was done not only during the elections, but a statement made by the president more than once, and i think it was in connection of promises made also to the israeli prime minister. how, will president obama fulfill the promise? wiggle out of it? absolutely implement it whether it's militarily or through containment policy, and what are they doing from my point of view, one of the reasons or a fascinating part about the gaza operation is that, a, they are giving hamas a lead in creating the new dynamics or dic
. >> it is worth it. three weeks after his reelection, majority of americans approve of the job president obama's doing in office. at 52%, it's the highest approval marks the president has received from the cnn/orc survey since may. a majority of people say his experience over the first four years will make him a better president in the second term. there is measured optimism, however, about the future. 56% believe the country will be better off four years from now, compare that to four years ago when 76% felt that way. >>> moving on now, governor chris christie is getting ready for a second term. the republican governor has filed paperwork to run for reelection. christie currently enjoys a record high approval rating from -- following his hands on response to hurricane sandy. before the storm, 56% of registered voters in the garden state approved of the job he was doing after sandy, they were surveyed again giving the governor -- >> look at these numbers. >> 77%. >> willie, you're a new jersey guy. new jersey native. i'm sure you can't remember a governor having a 77% approval rating, a republ
with president obama later today. wolf blitzer will sit down with the president-elect nieto and you will hear that interview later today on cnn. now, one of the topics the two leaders will likely discuss is immigration. it's a hot button issue between the united states and mechanixi. immigration laws in the united states have gotten tougher. yes, tougher. so tough, many families are returning to mexico from the united states. >> a 10-year-old boy is struggling with his homework. oscar is getting extra help from his father because he's having trouble adjusting to his new school. >> when you left you were in, what, fourth grade? >> third grade. >> the fifth grader is technically a foreigner in his homeland. he was born in arizona. >> i pledge allegiance -- >> has approximatet been difficult for you to be here in mexico? >> kind of. >> why? >> because i have to speak another language. >> oscar's 6-year-old sister, angie, also is an american citizen. she says she misses american stores, bigger houses and parks. their parents, oscar and maria castillanes lived in arizona for years as undocumented
. the white house says frankly that's not good enough. aides say president obama spoke with the house speaker john boehner and the senate majority leader harry reid over the weekend. and the president is confident they can work out some sort of agreement. mike emanuel on fox top story live in the d.c. newsroom tonight. mike, it looks like some republicans are changing their tunes. >> shep, republicans say they favor both major spending cuts and additional revenue from tax reform with lower tax rates. the pledge you mentioned is identified with americans for tax reforms grover norquist who has gotten many republicans to promise they won't vote to raise taxes. south carolina senator lindsey graham is pushing back saying capping deductions would help generate revenue. the top republic on the senate budget committee explained graham's position. >> he is conditioning any tax increase on fixing these programs, social security and medicare, particularly in making sure that they are sound for the future. so that's lindsey's position. and he has talked about accepting revenue to accomplish that goal.
our viewers on c-span as well. it's been almost exactly four years since president obama's a famously extended his hand of friendship and hope the iranians would unclench their fists. yet today after a few rounds of diplomacy, plenty more sanctions and centrifuge, there are plenty of clinched this on both sides and very little talk about friendship. there's been an attempt at diplomacy but political constraints on both sides have been difficult to advance an old habits are difficult to break. obama's one of the lowest in 2009 was quickly closed by the human rights abuses in the iran following the fraudulent elections. as well as a growing pressure from congress as will some u.s. allies in the region against diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expa
will also hear from president obama, who signed the deficit reduction measure into law, part of the deal to raise the debt ceiling. first, senate majority leader harry reid and republican majority leader mitch mcconnell will talk on the senate floor about the january fiscal deadline. >> since our country voted to return president obama to the white house, i have spoken often about compromise. i remain optimistic that, when it comes to our economy, when it comes to protecting middle-class families from a whopping tax hike, republicans and democrats will be able to find common ground. president dwight eisenhower, a republican, once said, "people talk about the middle of the road as though it were unacceptable. there have to be compromises. the middle of the road is all usable space." so said white house and higher. -- dwight eisenhower. too often, we face off, not realizing that the solution rests somewhere in the middle. i remind everyone of one fact. this congress is one vote away from avoiding a fiscal cliff for middle-class families and small businesses. we can solve the greatest econo
think particularly coming out of this -- obama out of a strong election. no one like gaddafi. no one liked libya. no one liked the soviets. it's doable. >> to partially answer the same question. the issue for many in congress is whether this negotiation quote-unquote allows iran to continue enriching at the 3.5% level or not. the historical position of the united states going back to the early 2000's has been that there should be a suspension of all enrichment as a confidence-building measure. from what you're saying, jim, we're well past that point and iran has a lot of truth on the ground in terms of additional centrifuges and they want the -- their so-called right under the nonproliferation treaty to be recognized. the question is at what level do they continue. >> i think there's also -- i agree with that. i want to go on here. there is a debate over countries have the right to enrich. they have a right to peaceful activities. there's some ambiguities about that. people disagree. both the iranians have said, offered this as a principle. i think it's important to have principles t
-profit practitioners discuss the role of private enterprise in public education. they lose also look at the obama administration approach to education reform. that was hosted yesterday at the american enterprise institute in washington. it is 90 minutes. >> hi. welcome, thanks for joining us. whether you're here at home, hope everybody had a terrific thanksgiving. i know that we're just getting back and, so the energy level is probably going to be, mellow, which we'll make that work for us, since we're going to talk about what sometimes is contentious subject. today's panel is on the question of for-profits and federal education policy. this is a topic that we ad aei have been interested in and talking about for an extended stretch. the last couple of years with the generous support of the templeton foundation we have been running the private enterprise and american education project trying to think about both the opportunities and the challenges, the upsides and the downsides of having for-profits involved in k-12 and higher education. how do we make this work for kids and communities how do we
that are going to happen when the ball drops on new year's eve unless president obama and congress come to some sort of compromise. >> stephen: all right so, we're all doomed. >> it's like the movie thaw you have to either cut off your arm or die. so they will come-- they will cut off their arm. >> stephen: do you know, do you know what kind of ratings the news could get if they could get politicians to cut off their arms on camera? okay. -- (cheers and applause) >> stephen: as i said senior white house correspondent for abc news. the only news anybody watches any more. >> i think that's true. >> stephen: and you have got eye new book here called the outpost, an untold story of american valor. this is about the war in afghanistan. >> it's about one combat outpost in afghanistan, 14 miles from the pakistan border, built at the bottom of three very steep mountains, built in 2006. and overrun in 2009 by the taliban. >> stephen: let's put a picture of this space right here. >> that's it. >> stephen: the space is at the bottom not up here where this guy is standing safely. >> that's right. >> stephe
to the same argument creating a bond. you are together for a long time. i hope president obama appoints another to the court, and work together for another 25 years. i said that once to justice kagan, and she said, only 25? [laughter] she's younger than i am. you learn to get along and know you work on a common enterprise. the level of the institution, the extent to which the justices have a collegial relationship with each other. >> two things to follow-up with a flip question. anything that unpleasantly surprised you since joining the court? >> yes. i'll limit that to one though. [laughter] "unpleasant" is the wrong word. i have a fair amount of responsibilities. the court is the highest in the land. it is a small government of the agency, people fall on the front steps, and you need the right computers of the court. we completed a renovation of the court involving a lot of administrative concerns. if you visit washington and visit the court, you wonder why the front is obscured by the scrim. it's like a sheet, and, well, the chunks of marble fell off of it. it's a huge enterprise to
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)